Recent Changes

Tuesday, August 8

  1. page home edited ... to the OGPau OGPAU website for EDIT 9 SEPTEMBER 2016 - Thank you for your interest in Aus…
    ...
    to the OGPauOGPAU website for
    EDIT 9 SEPTEMBER 2016 - Thank you for your interest in Australia's first National Action Plan to join the Open Government Partnership. The OGP team at the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet has convened an Interim Working Group to lead the last phases of co-drafting the National Action Plan. The Plan will be considered by the Australian Government and submitted to the Open Government Partnership by the end of 2016.
    For updates and current information, including potential commitments being discussed by the Interim Working Group (building on the suggestions made by stakeholders on this wiki and through other channels) and timeframes for this last phase of publication consultation, please visit the OGP Australia blog or get in touch via OGP@pmc.gov.au.
    (view changes)
    10:28 pm

Wednesday, October 19

  1. page home edited This wiki was set up for the development of the OGP Australian Government National Action Plan (NAP…
    This wiki was set up for the development of the OGP Australian Government National Action Plan (NAP). Please refer to the OGPau website for full information about the OGP and the current consultation.
    ...
    Partnership by 1 Novemberthe end of 2016.
    For updates and current information, including potential commitments being discussed by the Interim Working Group (building on the suggestions made by stakeholders on this wiki and through other channels) and timeframes for this last phase of publication consultation, please visit the OGP Australia blog or get in touch via OGP@pmc.gov.au.
    EDIT 31ST MARCH 2016 - Today is the deadline for suggested actions. You are welcome, and we encourage you, to comment on actions suggested on this wiki but submissions are now closed. Any actions suggested as topics for discussion after today will not be considered in the development of this National Action Plan. This cut off date is necessary for us to collate suggestions, brief agencies about your ideas and prepare for the workshop. Those of you who have made a suggestion will receive an invitation to an all day workshop in Canberra on the 11th April to discuss suggested actions with agencies and work with them to co-create commitment templates to be considered for inclusion in the National Action Plan.
    (view changes)
    3:56 pm

Thursday, September 8

  1. page home edited This This wiki was ... current consultation. EDIT EDIT 9 SEPTEMBER ... November 2016…

    This
    This wiki was
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    current consultation.
    EDIT

    EDIT
    9 SEPTEMBER
    ...
    November 2016.
    For

    For
    updates and
    ...
    via OGP@pmc.gov.au.
    EDIT 31ST MARCH 2016 - Today is the deadline for suggested actions. You are welcome, and we encourage you, to comment on actions suggested on this wiki but submissions are now closed. Any actions suggested as topics for discussion after today will not be considered in the development of this National Action Plan. This cut off date is necessary for us to collate suggestions, brief agencies about your ideas and prepare for the workshop. Those of you who have made a suggestion will receive an invitation to an all day workshop in Canberra on the 11th April to discuss suggested actions with agencies and work with them to co-create commitment templates to be considered for inclusion in the National Action Plan.
    5-15 commitments will be developed based on these actions for Australia's first National Action Plan. To find out more about these requirements see: http://www.opengovpartnership.org/how-it-works/requirements
    (view changes)
    8:40 pm
  2. page home edited This This wiki was ... Plan (NAP). It will be used for NAP consultations each 2 years and hi…
    This
    This
    wiki was
    ...
    Plan (NAP). It will be used for NAP consultations each 2 years and hibernate in between. Please refer
    ...
    information about the OGP and
    ...
    current consultation. Please note, the
    EDIT 9 SEPTEMBER 2016 - Thank you for your interest in Australia's
    first AustralianNational Action Plan to join the Open Government NAPPartnership. The OGP team at the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet has convened an Interim Working Group to lead the last phases of co-drafting the National Action Plan. The Plan will be finalisedconsidered by July 2016 with a multi-staged collaborative consultation approach as definedthe Australian Government and submitted to the Open Government Partnership by 1 November 2016.
    For updates and current information, including potential commitments being discussed by the Interim Working Group (building
    on the OGPau website.
    EDIT
    suggestions made by stakeholders on this wiki and through other channels) and timeframes for this last phase of publication consultation, please visit the OGP Australia blog or get in touch via OGP@pmc.gov.au.
    EDIT
    31ST MARCH 2016 - Today
    5-15 commitments will be developed based on these actions for Australia's first National Action Plan. To find out more about these requirements see: http://www.opengovpartnership.org/how-it-works/requirements
    PLEASE DO NOT ADD NEW TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION / SUGGESTED ACTIONS. YOU ARE WELCOME TO:
    (view changes)
    8:39 pm

Wednesday, August 3

  1. page home edited In the period preceding an election, the Australian Government assumes a caretaker role. It is i…

    In the period preceding an election, the Australian Government assumes a caretaker role. It is important during that time that Australian Government resources are not used to communicate political material. As this website is hosted by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, the site will be moderated from dissolution until after the election to ensure that political material is not placed on the site.

    This wiki was set up for the development of the OGP Australian Government National Action Plan (NAP). It will be used for NAP consultations each 2 years and hibernate in between. Please refer to the OGPau website for full information about OGP and the current consultation. Please note, the first Australian Government NAP will be finalised by July 2016 with a multi-staged collaborative consultation approach as defined on the OGPau website.
    EDIT 31ST MARCH - Today is the deadline for suggested actions. You are welcome, and we encourage you, to comment on actions suggested on this wiki but submissions are now closed. Any actions suggested as topics for discussion after today will not be considered in the development of this National Action Plan. This cut off date is necessary for us to collate suggestions, brief agencies about your ideas and prepare for the workshop. Those of you who have made a suggestion will receive an invitation to an all day workshop in Canberra on the 11th April to discuss suggested actions with agencies and work with them to co-create commitment templates to be considered for inclusion in the National Action Plan.
    (view changes)
    1:54 am

Monday, May 16

  1. page home edited In the period preceding an election, the Australian Government assumes a caretaker role. It is i…

    In the period preceding an election, the Australian Government assumes a caretaker role. It is important during that time that Australian Government resources are not used to communicate political material. As this website is hosted by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, the site will be moderated from dissolution until after the election to ensure that political material is not placed on the site.

    This wiki was set up for the development of the OGP Australian Government National Action Plan (NAP). It will be used for NAP consultations each 2 years and hibernate in between. Please refer to the OGPau website for full information about OGP and the current consultation. Please note, the first Australian Government NAP will be finalised by July 2016 with a multi-staged collaborative consultation approach as defined on the OGPau website.
    EDIT 31ST MARCH - Today is the deadline for suggested actions. You are welcome, and we encourage you, to comment on actions suggested on this wiki but submissions are now closed. Any actions suggested as topics for discussion after today will not be considered in the development of this National Action Plan. This cut off date is necessary for us to collate suggestions, brief agencies about your ideas and prepare for the workshop. Those of you who have made a suggestion will receive an invitation to an all day workshop in Canberra on the 11th April to discuss suggested actions with agencies and work with them to co-create commitment templates to be considered for inclusion in the National Action Plan.
    (view changes)
    7:04 pm

Friday, May 6

  1. msg Response to Conclusion from Tim Smith Accountability Roundtable message posted Response to Conclusion from Tim Smith Accountability Roundtable Full agreement is given to Tim Smith's opinions. I today have sent a letter to the Prime Minister,…
    Response to Conclusion from Tim Smith Accountability Roundtable
    Full agreement is given to Tim Smith's opinions.
    I today have sent a letter to the Prime Minister, with a copy to OGPau saying that the membership bid will fail because OGP's public participation requirements, guidelines and criteria, which have been detailed, have not been met.
    A copy has been sent to OGPau with a request that, despite it being very lengthy, it be posted on the wiki.
    It proposed a Public Interest Partnership Council to remedy the deficiencies. The Council proposal and a ser of accompanying Principles were sent to OGPau last week with a request that they be published but they were not.
    It is hoped that with the problem being published that a solution also will be published.
    1:58 am

Thursday, May 5

  1. msg Response to Conclusion from Tim Smith Accountability Roundtable message posted Response to Conclusion from Tim Smith Accountability Roundtable The Australian Government is committed to openness as a basic principle of modern government. The A…
    Response to Conclusion from Tim Smith Accountability Roundtable
    The Australian Government is committed to openness as a basic principle of modern government. The Australian Government’s membership with OGP and this two-year National Action Plan reflects Australia’s drive for improvement in government transparency, accountability, participatory democracy and innovation. In particular, the Australian Government’s commitments focus on improving public services and better managing public resources. The Australian Government’s National Action Plan was developed with civil society, the private sector and the public at large – in order to strengthen open government in Australia.

    Response; this paragraph suggests that the Australian Government is the member of the OGP, and the owner of the project Australia is not nor are the people of Australia. Further the government is the driver, designer and civil society, the private sector and the public are there simply to lend a hand.

    This would be consistent with the way the matter has been conducted to date including the years of membership from Australia’s joinder in 2013 to date with government departments working on the project over those years but no consultation with the community and, the Government seeing itself as the member of the OGP and therefore the director of proceedings. It also appears to assume that it is the Australian Government’s responsibility to decide the commitments with civil society, the private sector and the public at large playing a helping role. This would appear to be consistent with the way the matter has been conducted to date and the failure to consider the commitments sought by the people (or a failure to do so before preparing the published Draft Action Statement. It may be a practical way to start Australia’s Open Government Partnership but for it to flower and succeed we must sooner rather than later take up the challenges of the commitments that are spelt out in the OGP Articles of Governance but do so as genuine partners, they being the people and government.

    We must all look more closely at the actual OGP website where it is clear that the member of the OGP is the nation that applies and is admitted. The application is to be made by the government but it is done so on behalf of the nation. Everything from then on should reflect the reality of a partnership between the people and their government. As we have submitted in our earlier submissions, the guiding principle for both members of the partnership is that the powers being exercised by them are to be exercised for the people of the nation and the public interest must come first over any personal interests of those engaged in the process.

    It remains to be seen what is actually meant by the reference to Australia’s NAP being developed with civil society, the private sector and the public at large. That has not yet occurred.
    (posted by Amelia Loye on behalf of Tim Smith)
    5:15 pm
  2. msg Response to civil society engagement from Tim Smith Accountability Roundtable message posted Response to civil society engagement from Tim Smith Accountability Roundtable Civil Society Engagement “Throughout Australia’s National Action Plan drafting process, the Aust…
    Response to civil society engagement from Tim Smith Accountability Roundtable
    Civil Society Engagement

    “Throughout Australia’s National Action Plan drafting process, the Australian public has been actively engaged through the following mediums:
    social media (for example Twitter);
    the OGPAu website (ogpau.govspace.gov.au);
    in-person events (with live-streaming and online participation enabled where possible);
    a ‘wiki’ (which the public can log in and edit);
    email and postage contribution; and
    civil society, industry and other government jurisdiction led events for contributing to the consultation.”

    Response; a slight overstatement. A limited number of people have been engaged through a variety of mediums. The Australian public have not been “actively engaged”. There has been no consultation with government as yet. There has been no apparent attempt by Government through the media or otherwise to draw attention to the fact that this important development has occurred and everyone in Australia as the right to make a contribution in the development of the first NAP. Since the announcement of the preparation of the NAP on 17 November 2015, there has been very little reported by the media, and the government does not appear to have sought its assistance. The result has been that the general public knows very little about it.

    “The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet has established a dedicated team, including engagement specialists, to manage the drafting process. This team is responsible for engaging community groups, private sector, government agencies and everyday citizens who have expressed an interest in Open Government or the Grand Challenges to contribute to the plan. “


    “The NAP has been developed in five stages, three of which involved public and civil society engagement.”

    Response; it is true that the first three stages have involved public and civil society “engagement”. As at, 8 April,, however, by which time the government had prepared a draft NAP there had not been any consultation between government and civil society, in respect of submissions and materials delivered to the government website by them as members of civil society.

    “The National Action Plan has been developed across five stages, three that involve engagement, to ensure we meet the OGP requirements, including the June 2016 deadline:
    Stage 1 – Prepare the NAP framework and collect background information (November – December 2015)
    Stage 2 – Raise awareness of the initiative, gather commitment suggestions (January – March 2016)
    Stage 3 – Prioritise commitments and host a drafting workshop (April 2016)
    Stage 4 – Submit the draft NAP for consideration by the Australian Government (May 2016 – June 2016)
    Stage 5 – Pending the Australian Government’s decision, aim to launch the National Action Plan (July 2016)

    The engagement approach was designed to be open, transparent, and efficient, empowering individuals and organisations to contribute meaningfully. “

    Response; accepting that was the scope intent, it clearly did not include consultation and discussion between government and citizens in partnership. It did not take long in the process begun on 17 November 2015 for issues to be identified which required such consultation and discussion (such as the Vision and the Background Material) and as at 8 April there is no evidence to suggest anything raised by civil society has been considered by the government itself.

    “During stage one, information sessions were held across Australia in December 2015 to inform stakeholders about the National Action Plan.”

    Response; it is interesting to see that those few people who did find out about the OGP exercise have been identified as the stakeholders about the NAP. So too, however, are those holding public office in government, elected and nonelected, and all citizens of Australia; for they are all members of Australia’s Open Government Partnership ;.

    “Stage two focused on encouraging stakeholders to suggestion commitments related to the chosen Grand Challenges.
    During this stage, a public wiki was created for the purposes of collaborative drafting. Civil Society and the public were invited to suggest actions directly onto the wiki, where they could also view and comment on existing suggestions. Contributions were initially added to a general commitments page, then categorised into nine themes.”

    Response; this (, and what is mentioned below), was all important work but it is noted that there was still no input from government to enable consultation to occur between the people and government. This has continued up until now and it remains to see whether that will change on 11 April.

    “As drafting progressed, the engagement coordinator facilitated introductions between contributors with shared interests. In response to stakeholder interest, a teleconference series was initiated for discussion of themes and commitments among civil society members before the drafting workshop.

    As they were identified throughout the process, stakeholders with aligned interests were introduced by email by the engagement coordinator. In response to stakeholder interest, a teleconference series was also used to connect stakeholders and discuss themes among civil society.

    Submissions for suggested actions closed on the 31 March 2016, but comments were still welcomed on the wiki. Two follow up teleconferences were also scheduled so that civil society stakeholders could connect before the April workshop. The engagement coordinator provided her contact details so that stakeholders could call or email her directly with questions, at any time.

    During Stage three, civil society organisations and members of the public who had proposed an action in Stages One and Two were invited to join government agency representatives at a workshop on proposed commitments (on 11 April 2016). At this event, they also discussed the formation of an implementation committee to oversee the progress of Australia’s first National Action Plan, and discussion of the formation of the group who will oversee the implementation of Australia’s first National Action Plan.

    Response; It is noted that this material was prepared in advance of the workshop and does not suggest there would be any consultation on issues – we will have to wait and see what happens
    (posted by Amelia Loye on behalf of Tim Smith)
    5:14 pm
  3. msg Response to EFFORTS TO DATE message posted Response to EFFORTS TO DATE Australia has a proud history of open government, and has already taken significant strides towards…
    Response to EFFORTS TO DATE
    Australia has a proud history of open government, and has already taken significant strides towards government transparency and civic participation.

    Response; as said above, it has been very patchy at the Commonwealth level, and elsewhere, and unfortunately at the Commonwealth Level significant strides have not been taken towards government transparency and civic participation. Rather since 2014 there has been a retreat from the action referred to in the next paragraph and the Freedom of Information Paragraph below with the de facto abolition of the OAIC the present government, a reform that had brought the FOI system out of its failed status. Nothing has been said to indicate that the present government intends to reverse that position. The unwillingness to formally address Grand Challenge number two “Increasing Public Integrity”, also raises serious questions about where Australia is heading in honouring its obligations as a member of the OGP.

    “Declaration of Open Government
    The Australian Government launched a Declaration of Open Government in 2010. It also fully adopted the recommendations of Ahead of the Game: Blueprint for the Reform of Australian Government Administration, a report which emphasised the need to create a more open government.

    Open reporting
    All Australian Government entities are required to produce and publish their annual reports, budgets, contracts and a variety of other reporting requirements for the purposes of oversight and transparency. The mandate for this is under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

    Similarly, reporting on federal budgets, bills and legislation is published, alongside all Parliamentary transcripts, tabled documents, Committee work, and more.”

    Response; Looking around the world, these generally are matters that Australia can be proud of but at the same time, particularly at the Commonwealth level, we have probably the weakest government integrity system in Australia. Government Integrity is Grand Challenge 2 on the O GP list. Why are we not addressing it. No explanation as yet been given by the Government.

    “Freedom of information
    The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) was established in 2010 under the new Australian Information Commissioner Act 2010. Over the course of the next four years, the Freedom of Information Act (1982) was updated. These reforms make it easier for the public to request access to information and require agencies to proactively publish information.

    The 2010 reforms to the Freedom of Information Act included the introduction of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS) which requires Australian Government agencies subject to the FOI Act to provide a broad range of information on their websites.

    Decisions made under the Archives Act (for preserving and conserving the archives of the Commonwealth) have also been impacted, with a resulting reduction in the period of time in which the FOI Act applies for access to Commonwealth documents. The open access period for Commonwealth records (except for Cabinet notebooks and census information) will be reduced from 30 years to 20 years over a 10 year period commencing from 1 November 2010. “

    Response; in the revised Government Background Material document lodged on the Australian OPG website, after the lodging of ART proposed revised draft, reference was added to the fact that there was a Bill before the Parliament to abolish the OAIC. That has not been repeated in the draft NA P. As partners, the people of Australia are entitled to know whether this is an oversight or whether the Government has in fact decided to abandon its attempt to abolish the OAIC. If it is still planning to abolish it, the NAP should say so and explain why it is proceeding with that plan.

    “Whistle-blower protections
    Whistle-blower protections in Australia were significantly improved by the 2013 Public Interest Disclosure Actwhich officially commenced on 15 January 2014. The stated purpose of the Act is to facilitate disclosure and investigation of wrongdoing and maladministration in the Commonwealth public sector, and for other purposes. Under the Act, those who disclose wrongdoing in the public sector can expect that their case will be properly managed, appropriate action will be taken, and that they will receive protection from reprisal and immunity from criminal, civil and administrative liability. “

    Response; the 2013 legislation was a significant improvement. But the NAP fails to draw attention to some of its ongoing failures and limitations (http://www.accountabilityrt.org/whistle-blower-protection-our-submission-to-the-review-of-the-act/ ) which should be receiving attention particularly when regard is had to the OGP guiding principle.

    By and large the matters that are raised in and between the next topic address the voluntary provision of information by government, which if increased, has the potential to raise the openness of government and to some extent it’s accountability. But they do not address the major problem area of a lack of openness preventing government being held to account, which is taken up briefly below in the topic “Senate Estimates”.

    “Adoption of Creative Commons
    To accommodate access to government information and bring consistency to licensing arrangements, the public service adopted Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.”

    “Public Data Policy Statement
    The data held by the Australian Government is a strategic national resource that holds considerable value for growing the economy, improving service delivery and transforming policy outcomes for the Nation.

    The Australian Government, in recognising the importance of effectively managing this national resource for the benefit of the Australian people, has committed to optimise the use and reuse of public data; to release non-sensitive data as open by default; and to collaborate with the private and research sectors to extend the value of public data for the benefit of the Australian public.
    Public data includes all data collected by government entities for any purposes including; government administration, research or service delivery. Non-sensitive data is anonymised data that does not identify an individual or breach privacy or security requirements.”

    “Data.gov.au
    Data.gov.au is an online portal, established in 2010, to centralise access to appropriately anonymised, government data. It facilitates citizen access and reuse of public datasets. In addition to providing access to a catalogue of available datasets, the portal houses a toolkit containing a wide range of resources on open data.

    Since its inception, the number of discoverable datasets has grown from approximately 500 to over 7,000.
    To deliver the Public Data Statement, Australian Government entities will publish appropriately anonymised government data on or linked through data.gov.au for discoverability and availability.

    Among the many public sector datasets now available under open data terms is a national geocoded address file. The open release of this highly sought after file will remove barriers to greater use of the data and unlock and create opportunities for industry innovation and competitiveness.”

    “Digital Transformation Office
    The Digital Transformation Office (DTO) was established in July 2015 and is part of the Prime Minister’s portfolio. Its mission is to lead the transformation of government services to deliver a better experience for all Australians.

    The DTO itself works as an incubator helping to develop an environment – including the method, culture and talent – that supports rapid service transformation.

    To achieve this, the DTO is building digital expertise and capabilities across government agencies, helping to create a world-class public service and a world-leading digital economy.

    Its priorities are to deliver projects that demonstrate the best ways to achieve rapid transformation, to improve in-house digital capabilities in government agencies, and establish common platforms to make government more efficient. “

    “Senate Estimates
    At least two times each year, estimates of proposed annual expenditure of government agencies are referred by the Senate to eight legislation committees for examination and report. This process ensures transparency and encourages efficiency in government spending. These hearings are documented and available for public consumption.”

    Response; the Senate Committee system is a very important and often successful in holding the Executive to account and extracting information which had not been made available. It must also be noted, however, that it isn’t always successful because, on occasions, for example, those being questioned will give responses that fail to answer questions asked and continue to do so when they receive follow up questions on notice. Recent examples include questions seeking information about the Government’s actions against the OAIC.

    These procedures, however, are very important and valuable nonetheless. On their own, however, they cannot adequately guard against the risks of corruption in government which have steadily risen over recent years as
    · government services and services to government had been outsourced,
    · a significant lobbying industry has grown,
    · elected officers when they retire taking up employment by lobbyists or in commercial bodies to lobby for them,
    · the funding arms race has increased but it’s transparency has declined significantly and donations declaration limits are too high and
    and the current jurisdiction of the Commonwealth anti-corruption investigatory body, ACLEI, is very limited and we don’t have such a body covering the whole of the public sector and those engaged in delivering public services to or for government.

    “Anti-Corruption
    Active engagement in a range of regional and international forums and initiatives to combat corruption is led by the Attorney-General’s Department.

    Australia is a key member of the G20 Anti-Corruption Working Group, and led the development of the G20 Anti-Corruption Action Plan, and the subsequent 2015-16 Anti-Corruption Implementation Plan.

    In 2012 Australia's implementation of Chapters III (Criminalisation & Law Enforcement) and IV (International Cooperation) of the United Nations Convention against Corruption was reviewed and found to be fully compliant.

    Australia ranked 13th out of 168 countries on Transparency International’s 2015 Corruption Perception Index.”

    Response; the discussion of Australia’s activity overseas is to be contrasted with a lack of mention of such activity in Australia at the Commonwealth level. As to the UNCAC, it is not mentioned that Australia commenced the preparation of its National Anti--Corruption Plan in 2012 (which involved selective but genuine consultation) but nothing has been heard of its progress and nothing has been said in the NA P draft. Presumably that means that the government does not propose to do anything about finalising that Plan – for the opportunity is there to commit to something that would, and would be seen to, address Grand Challenge two. It would not, however, be something ambitious because it is already long overdue.

    As to Australia’s TI rating it has slipped every year of the last four years. Why are we not aiming for the top position?,
    (Posted by Amelia Loye on behalf of Tim Smith)

    Response; Predominantly? There does not appear to be any evidence that the Government will focus on other things, and if it intends to, how the present draft NA P does so.

    “ Australia already has a strong tradition of accountability and public safety, and whilst there is always more work to be done, the opportunities for greatest impact lie in empowering the citizen by streamlining services and managing public resources, particularly through efficient data access.

    Response; putting to one side public safety, as already stated, in some States and Territories of Australia there is a strong tradition of accountability. In other jurisdictions there is not. One of those is the Commonwealth.
    An attempt was made to explain those realitiesin the earlier submissions of the ART – have they been read
    Considered?

    “In accordance with OGP principles, the commitments outlined in the following pages build on our solid foundation of transparency, accountability, participatory democracy and technological innovation.”

    Response; we may have a solid foundation in technological innovation but, focusing on the circumstances in the Commonwealth of Australia, which is the present primary objective of the Australian OGP, there is no such solid foundation for the other matters mentioned and the action proposed clearly fails the test established by the OGP that the plan must be “ambitious”. That obligation is not addressed in the proposed commitments. Further, it seems clear from a comparison with the relevant OGP Governance Articles of that regard has not been had to the objectives of the OGP and the commitment obligations accepted on joining by Australia and its government

    “They have been developed alongside key civil society and public stakeholders to ensure their relevance beyond government. Drafted through a process of online and in-person collaboration, this National Action Plan reflects Australia’s ambitious open government agenda for the next two years and beyond. “

    Response; it is true they have been developed “alongside key civil society and public stakeholders” but there has been no discussion to date let alone any consultation between government and civil society, and though adequate notice for such consultation (see, for example, the express obligation in the Articles of Governance ( page 19), placed on all participants). This is the key feature of the OGP and critical to the success of the OGP and its member nations.

    Government and civil society commit to a partnership. In this first step, however, apart from notifying some civil society groups and people with a record of interest in this area, no attempt has been made to involve the media or the broader community. In the process that has been employed in which civil society has been given the opportunity to make submissions for government to consider, there is no evidence as yet that any such consideration has been given by the Commonwealth Government. There has been to date no consultation.
    5:12 pm

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